Thursday, May 29, 2014

Little Puffs of Smoke

 

This diminutive perennial is a native plant I have wanted to add to my garden for sometime. This spring I was delighted to finally come across a plant at my favourite local nursery.

All of these photos were taken at the Toronto Botanical Gardens

The feathery seed heads have given this tiny wildflower a couple of common names; one is Old Man's Whiskers and the more common is Prairie Smoke

The proper botanical name is Geum triflorum.


The fern-like foliage is semi-evergreen and turns red, orange or purple in late fall.


Nodding, rose colored blooms appear mid-spring (April to June depending on your location) 
and continue throughout the summer.


The somewhat crazy looking seed heads, which do look rather like puffs of smoke or the silky whiskers on an old man, unfold as the flowers fade.


Geum triflorum: Height: 30 cm, Spread: 40-60 cm. It tolerates most soil types, but like most perennials, it will be happiest in well-drained soil that has been enriched with some organic matter. Full sun is best. Once established Geum triflorum is pretty low maintenance and is very drought tolerant.

 Geum triflorum is one of those plants you just want to reach out and touch!

24 comments:

  1. I want one!! That is the coolest plant that I have seen in a long time!! I am smitten with the texture of this one and couple that with the color and I would say this one is a winner!!! Happy weekend to you friend! Nicole xo

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  2. What a fun plant to add to your garden - I like the 'puff of smoke' effect and the fact that it is drought tolerant. I am pinning this one up.

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  3. Fascinating and pretty with those feathery like blooms. I like the puff of smoke name much better then the technical name of the plant. Happy that you found one for your own garden.

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  4. I've never seen anything quite like this, Jennifer, and it sure is beautiful.

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  5. Isn't it wonderful when you find something unusual you've been looking for at a garden centre. What a great addition. I'd never heard of this plant before!

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  6. Thanks for sharing! So many of my 'blog friends 'here in France have been buying and planting geums. I haven't yet done so.... But your Prairie smoke is beautiful.

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  7. It does look interesting, and very tactile. I will look out for it over here.

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  8. This is a new one on me Jennifer - it looks quite charming - I wonder if it is a good 'do-er'. It will be interesting to see how yours fairs.

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  9. This is such a dainty Geum. People are starting to notice geums, as more and more gorgeous varieties become available. I have Lemon Drops and Totally Tangerine and I am excited to grow some from seed as you never know what you will get. I love the whispy seed heads of yours, it is so pretty.

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  10. You are always introducing us to new things! Looks like I better go shopping as one of these has got to be in my garden!!

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  11. I have never seen one of these before ~ what a great plant! I wonder if it would grow in our warm climate...I will definitely be looking for it. Thank you!

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  12. It's funny! I love its name Old Man's Whiskers!
    I'd like to have it in my garden as well, Jennifer.

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  13. I have always loved how this plant looks and its name!!

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  14. Hi Jennifer! This is one of the plants that make me smile. I like its airy look!

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  15. That’s a new one for me too, funny plant with a funny name. Not sure it would like my shady garden though but for the right location it would be good. Thanks for introducing us to a string of new plants :-)

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  16. Hi Jennifer
    Fuzzy little cuties - I love them! Thanks for introducing me to a new plant!

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  17. I've loved this plant ever since I saw it at the Lurie Gardens in Chicago several years ago. Last year I planted a bare root start I had purchased, but I forgot to mark it. I'm pretty sure I accidentally pulled it out when I planted something else later in the same spot. Lesson learned: always mark your plantings!

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  18. I have not seen this plant before now. The name seems apt!

    Karen

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  19. I've seen this before and just love it. I love it's soft feathery appearance. I may have to find a spot for in my garden if it will grow in my zone. :o)

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  20. What a great plant! And now, I must add it to my bottomless plant must-have list. :)

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  21. Très spéciale cette plante, mais très jolie. Bonne soirée.

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  22. My sister grows this plant out in Calgary and I have always admired it. Nice to see it grows well here too.

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